Christian Domestic Discipline — when life imitates art?

WARNING: Graphic information on the fallacy of “Christian” Domestic Discipline.

Churchmouse Campanologist

This post is for adults only. It’s not meant to be titillating and addresses a serious issue, although casual readers might laugh. For those who are offended, of a sensitive nature or who do not wish to read about Satan’s influence in Christianity, please skip this one.

There is a website by the name Christian Domestic Discipline, which you can search for if interested. Its margins contain New Testament verses from Paul’s epistles.

A close reading will show that the site is most likely a hoax. The syntax and some of the language appear to be British. (Why am I not surprised? In 2010, a spoof blog which carried my site on its blogroll appeared during the Edinburgh Festival. I have no idea if the two were linked as part of a comedy act playing there, but the ‘Baptist pastor’ from a plausibly named but nonexistent town in England…

View original post 1,980 more words

Advertisements

A woman comes to you…

 

A woman comes to you. She says she’s been abused. You look at her face. It’s evident that she’s stressed. Something is going on but you don’t know what. You ask her a few questions. She looks down, won’t make eye contact. Her answers are all over the place. She’s obviously confused, maybe lying. You don’t really have the time to try to find out. You tell her she must go home, repent, try harder, pray more. Do more to be a better wife, to try to make her husband happy. “If it doesn’t get better, let me know.” Patting yourself on the back, you relegate it to the back of your mind. “Thank you, Lord, that I was able to be there for her.”

A woman comes to you. She says she’s been abused. You tell her you know her husband. He’s a good man, a gentle man, a kind and loving man. There’s no way he could do the things she says he’s done. “You must be mistaken. You must have pushed him in some way. He’s never do anything like this.” She tries to explain but nothing she says meshes with what you are sure you know. “I’ll pray for you but the ball is really in your court. If you want a better marriage, you have to work for a better marriage.” You send her home but just for good measure, you call up her husband. “Your wife came in here saying things that I knew couldn’t be true. I just thought you’d want to know.” He gives you a sob story about how unbalanced she is. “I try everything in my power but it just never gets any better.” After promising to pray for him so that he’ll know how to help his wife, you hang up the phone. “Thank you, Lord, for letting me be here to pray for him and even for her. It must be so hard having a wife like that.”

A woman comes, asking to talk. She tells you that there isn’t enough money for food, not enough money for the doctor, not enough money for the power and the mortgage because her husband won’t give it to her. “Our children need so much but he spends the money on other things, I don’t even know where it all goes. It’s always like this, and I don’t know what to do.” You look at her clothes. She’s shabbily dressed. You look at her car. It’s top of the line. You know where she lives; the neighborhood is nice, upscale. She sees your doubt. “That car,” she says, “he insisted that he had to have that for business….” Looking back at her you tell her, “I know where you live. Your house is expensive. Your car is, too. Obviously your husband wouldn’t have made such important decisions without you. You need more money? Sell the car, get something nice but much cheaper. Cut out other luxuries. Move to a cheaper place. There’s a lot you can do to make things better. Maybe get into financial counseling. You need to learn to spend money on what’s important. We can’t help you.” She tries once again to explain but, really, there’s no explanation necessary. The truth is so obvious. You send her away, shaking your head as you do. As you sit down to dinner that night, you once again think about her story. Then you pray, “Teach us to be grateful for what we’ve been given, for the bounty set before us, and help us to always be ready to share with those in need.” And, thankful that you don’t know anyone who is really in need, you start to eat.

A woman comes to you….

What do you do?

 

Leaving All You Know

The Abuse Expose' with Secret Angel

Leaving all you know…
with the clothes on your back.
Choosing to walk away…
from all abusive attacks.
For victims reach a point…
that they can take no more…
then finally escape…
when they get an “open door”.
But those doors can open…
quicker than we even know…
when we call upon the Lord…
to open a way for you to go.
For He sees the abuses…
and the brokenness inside…
and knows every wound…
that victims try to hide.

View original post 127 more words